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Showing Posts Tagged: motivation

Wednesday’s How To: Beat Procrastination!

Some of us do well under pressure, others not so much… take a look at Business Insider’s 5 ways to beat Procrastination to find solutions that work best for you.

But then again it’s 2012, a new year and time to really start working on those resolutions before they’re long forgotten. If you’re ready to kick procrastination to the curb permanently, we love workawesome.com’ssolution- just stop doing it! They remind us that “discipline is remembering what you want…” so take some time and figure our your priorities and read more of their tips below

How Do We Beat Procrastination?

Understand the flavors of motivation. Internal motivation is a product of your own values and goals. External motivation involves rewards – like a salary – for completing tasks and penalties – like a poor performance review – for failure. As much as we’d love our strongest motivation to come from within, we tend to put externally motivated tasks ahead of internally motivated ones. In other words, you may want very badly to spend the evening with your family, but you feel that you have to finish that externally-motivated project report by midnight.

Practice volitional skills. Psychologically speaking, “volitional skills” is just the scientific term for “willpower,” but there is an important distinction between the terms: People consider willpower to be innate, something you’re born with (or born without). It sounds like an easy avenue for excuses; whenever you want to procrastinate, you can shrug and proclaim “I just don’t have the willpower,” as if there’s no way to summon the initiative to get the job done.

The excuse just isn’t viable: “Willpower” is not a power given at birth. It’s a volitional skill; you can develop it, improve it or neglect it. Consider your volitional skills like muscles; you can strengthen them, but you can also exhaust them. They benefit from rest, so pick your willpower battles carefully.

Stop calling yourself a procrastinator. If you get too comfortable with procrastination, you’ll eventually find yourself neglecting your job, your family and your personal health. Instead of declaring yourself a procrastinator, declare your productive intentions and remind yourself of your goals. As David Campbell said: “Discipline is remembering what you want.”

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